Inniswood Village residents move into their new home with the help of National Church Residences volunteers

By Elizabeth Randolph

Erandolph@nationalresidences.org

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Move-ins started on August 15 and now the first wave of new residents can call Inniswood Village home!

Volunteers from both National Church Residences and Downsize with a Heart, a program through Furniture Bank of Ohio, were in attendance to assist the residents with bringing in furniture, clothing and other items. A lemonade stand was also available to refresh volunteers in the almost 90-degree weather.

The community is adjacent to the peaceful and serene Inniswood Metro Gardens and offers residents a carefree and maintenance-free lifestyle. Amenities include a chapel, library, bistro, club room, wellness center, guest suite and community room.  “There are 40 senior living apartments in this building,” said Tiffany Affolter, Corporate Marketing Director in the Senior Living division. “It’s a two-story building and has a [underground] parking garage.”

For some residents, moving into Inniswood Village is the first time they’ve had to downsize from a family home to an apartment. This is the reality for Bette Coles, one of Inniswood Village’s firstresidents.  “Before I moved here I had a six-bedroom house,” said Coles. “At first I thought ‘this isn’t enough room’ but I’m really looking forward to not having to do any repairs because it was an old house.”

Coles, who is from North Columbus, says the decision to move to Inniswood Village seemed like something she was destined to do. “My husband passed away last July and he loved Inniswood Metro Gardens,” said Coles. “He worked as a bus driver in Westerville for years. Inniswood Village just seemed like the perfect place for me.”

While she says moving can be stressful, Coles is happy to be in her new home. “I’m looking forward to meeting everyone,” she said. “Once I get everything situated it’s going to be great.”

Inniswood Village is set to have approximately 15 new residents by August 18.

 

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Bette Coles in her apartment 

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Coles with her nephew in her apartment

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Volunteers from “Downsize with a heart” with a new Inniswood resident

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Doug Himes, VP of Operations for Residential Services is working hard in an Inniswood Village apartment. 

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Items provided by Inniswood Village staff to residents

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Lemonade stand to refresh volunteers

National Church Residences’ Atlanta Resident Naomi Barber King Opens Her Home, History and Heart

 

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King sitting in her living room at a National Church Residences property

By Sojourner Marable Grimmett

“Everyone has a story and if you don’t tell your story then it might not ever get told.” – Naomi Barber King
 
A black and silver butterfly burette rested perfectly in her snow white colored hair. She proudly stood in her living room, wearing a white sweater-set with black trimming, black pants. I was greeted with a bright, big smile, as I entered the home of Mrs. Naomi Barber King, located at a National Church Residences’ property just about 15 minutes southwest of Atlanta, Georgia. I extended my hand and she leaned in for a hug.
 
She led me by the hand, as together we circled the space, both admiring her numerous photographs and precious memories on the walls. The feeling of African American history and pride was overwhelming. I pictured myself living as her in her prime in the 1960’s, rallying for civil rights and “justice for all.” Old photos adorned the walls of her late husband Rev. Alfred Daniel “A.D.” King, brother-in-law Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and sister-in-law Coretta Scott King. Mrs. King picked up a celebratory card off of her maple coffee table and placed it in my hands. I opened the card and read it to myself quietly and then spoke the final words aloud, “Signed, Sister Coretta.”
 
Mrs. King was born in Dothan, Alabama in 1931, and was raised an only child to Bessie May Barber. At the age of 5 years old, her mother decided to relocate them from Dothan to Atlanta, Georgia to live with her brother. We sat down across from each other on comfortable flower patterned beige cushions as Mrs. King reflected on her childhood. “All of the memories of my childhood are based on the things that children do and enjoy. I had a wonderful childhood. I did well in school and took piano lessons. I was very well loved and protected.”
 
 “What was your most fond memory as a child?” I asked.  Her voice changed and the gaze in her eyes became cloudy as they watered a bit. She replied, “I met my beloved husband when we were 12 and 13 years old at the YMCA. We became friends and you might say that our puppy love evolved. As my boyfriend he gave me all of the attention that any girl needed, leaving no stones unturned. My most fond memory was when I turned 16, and he surprised me with a Sweet 16 birthday party.”
 
After graduating from high school, Mrs. King enrolled in Spelman College in 1949 and left school after her first year to marry A.D. King in 1950. Rev. A.D. King stayed in school and graduated from Morehouse College, soon after beginning his pastoral career.
 
Mrs. King’s bright smile turned into a worrisome frown when I asked the question “Can you talk to me about the day your home was bombed in Birmingham on May 11, 1963?”
 
“Everyone has a story and if you don’t tell your story then it might not ever get told,” she said. Her voice became soft as she cleared her throat and spoke:
 
“On a Saturday night before Mother’s Day it was around 11 o’clock in the evening and I was in the dining room area preparing the table decorations for Mother’s Day. My husband was in the bedroom working on his sermon, and our five beautiful children; Alveda, Alfred II, Derek I, Darlene, and Vernon were in their rooms. After I finished decorating the table, I sat in the living room area. I noticed that the picture window began to crack, and I shrugged my shoulders as if it was nothing, and continued to decorate the table.
 
The Lord would have it that my husband came to the front of the home and he went to the front door, opened it, and looked up and down the street. He said to me, “Naomi let’s get out of here.” It was so quiet you could hear a cotton ball fall on the carpet. By the time we got to the center of our home that was when the first bomb went off and then a second bomb exploded and the front of the house was blown away. I believe the bombs caused me to have permanent hearing loss in one of my ears. By God’s grace all 7 of us were able to go out of the back of the home, and that no one was hurt. God has a time planned for everybody and a purpose for everybody. It was our time at that time to bring focus to the world on what was happening in Birmingham.”
 
This wouldn’t be their last encounter with a bomb. When Rev. A.D. King pastored a church in Louisville, Kentucky, the church was also bombed. And tragically just one year after the assassination of his beloved brother in Memphis, Tennessee in 1968, Rev. A.D. King was found dead at his home, lying in the family swimming pool.
 
To suggest that the King family has had more than their share of heartbreaks, does not begin to touch upon the trauma and devastation they have endured. Mrs. King has always relied on her faith. She reminds herself often to “fear not for God is with us always.” With all that she has been through, Mrs. King remains optimistic about Atlanta, and current conditions in the surrounding world. She believes that “there is good in people and that all problems can be worked out if we just sit down and talk to one another.”
 
We shared a warm smile of appreciation with each other when the interview concluded. Before leaving her home, Mrs. King pointed to a picture of Rev. A.D. King in her bedroom. She reflected on a time when her late husband asked a violinist to play a song while they were eating dinner at a restaurant. “That’s why I loved him so much. He was so thoughtful.” A true love story cut short too soon. Her life story is a testament of love, hope, and triumph.
 
Mrs. King continues to share her husband’s contributions and legacy as an activist and minister. She is a beloved mother, grandmother, great grandmother, and bright light to those in the church and communities she serves.
 
Author’s Note: Thank you to Dr. Babs Onabanjo, Co-Founder and CEO of the A.D. King Foundation for arranging the interview. More information can be found about Rev. Alfred Daniel “A.D.” King and Naomi Barber King at www.adkingfoundation.com.
 

‘Home for Life’ to expand and serve Columbus’ Near East Side

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Christine Leyshon, National Church Residences Community Program Manager, and Rosemary Mathes, National Church Residences Service Coordinator, will be part of the team that will bring Home for Life to Columbus’ Near East Side seniors.

COLUMBUS, Ohio ­– The Osteopathic Heritage Foundation has awarded a Healthy Aging Initiative grant in the amount of $254,209 to National Church Residences to help the organization expand the Home for Life program to residents of Columbus’ Near East Side.

“The project is a combination of strategies,” said Jeff Wolf, National Church Residences Senior Vice President of Philanthropy and Mission Impact. “It expands the reach of our Home for Life model to seniors who live outside of our affordable housing properties, while the model itself is an innovation designed to help seniors in the community age in place.”

The Healthy Aging Initiative grant, administered over a two-year span, will touch the lives of nearly 700 at-risk Franklin County seniors. According to Wolf, “The grant is significant beyond its financial investment. A partnership with the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation provides an opportunity to launch innovative solutions that encourage community collaboration and the development of replicable programming.”

“The Osteopathic Heritage Foundation is proud to partner with National Church Residences to share the Home for Life program with residents of Columbus’ Near East Side,” said Susan Beaudry, Director of Programs at the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation. “This innovative program has great potential to provide older, vulnerable adults with the care and support needed to remain in their homes and communities of their choice.”

National Church Residences’ Home for Life program is an outcomes-focused service model, using evidence-based assessments and evaluation tools to identify an individual’s needs and risk factors. By engaging those we serve where they live, Home for Life can identify and overcome social determinant factors that impact an individual’s ability to best manage their chronic diseases, leading to higher satisfaction and engagement, better health and cost savings.

“The objective is to improve access to care and self-management skills of older vulnerable populations by giving them the tools to understand and manage their own care, allowing them to remain in their homes as they age,” said Wolf.

This program will bring the Home for Life model to seniors on Columbus’ Near East Side who do not reside in a National Church Residences facility. The focus is on an area that surrounds the Champion Intergenerational Enrichment and Education Center, at 240 N. Champion Ave.

Bristol Village Olympians bring home 27 medals

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Several of the members of the Bristol Village Senior Olympics team pose with their medals in the courtyard of the Glenn Center in Waverly. Pictured are, left to right, Judy Doll, Otto Zingg, Betsy Hall, Marj Andrus, Ken Love, Mary McElhaney, Sherry Sapienza, Frankie Rinehart, Len Nasman and Gareth Baker.

By LANCE CRANMER                                                              lcranmer@nationalchurchresidences.org

WAVERLY, Ohio – When Marj Andrus stepped to the podium to receive her gold medal, the Senior Olympian from Bristol Village ran into an issue.

To combat the hot summer sun in her events – the 1500- and 5000-meter racewalk – the 98-year old is never without a large, colorful hat.

“That’s the problem,” Marj said. “You can’t get the medal over your head with the hat on. You just need a longer ribbon!”

Marj is one of 17 senior athletes who represented Bristol Village earlier this summer in the Ohio Senior Olympics in the Columbus suburb of Westerville. Altogether, the Bristol Village Olympians brought home 27 medals – including 13 gold, seven silver and seven bronze.

“I had to learn a new walk,” said Marj, who for many years has started each day with a long morning walk to McDonald’s for ice cream. “(For the racewalk) you have to walk with your knees stiff. I had to focus so much on my knees that I didn’t have time to get nervous. Then someone stuck out their hand and stopped me and said, ‘you’re here!’”

“They told us Marj probably had a Senior Olympic record in the 5,000 meters,” said Betsy Hall, who organized the athletics team at Bristol Village. “At 98-years old, they don’t know of anyone else that age who has done it.”

“They told me the record for just for the US and Canada,” Marj added. “I thought, ‘Canada? That’s big enough!”

Betsy, a marathon runner for 21 years, has competed in four National Senior Olympics, winning three gold, one silver and two bronze medals.

Thanks to her enthusiasm for the competition, several of her friends began participating as well.

“It was Betsy,” said Otto Zingg, a medalist in golf and pickleball at the Ohio Senior Olympics. “She started to promote it and encouraged us to participate.

“I thought, well, I’ll do it.”

Otto teamed with Gareth Baker to earn a bronze medal in doubles pickleball – a tennis-like sport played with a wiffleball and paddles – and earned a silver in golf.

“I just turned 80 in June,” he said. “I figured there were not too many others in that age category so I had a good chance to medal.”

Frankie Rinehart also got involved with the Senior Olympics with Betsy’s encouragement.

“Good thing I have this friend,” she said, pointing to Betsy. “I’m kind of an athletic person. So when she said, ‘let’s go,’ I just went.”

Frankie won a gold medal in the 1500-meter and 5000-meter racewalk, a gold in women’s singles table tennis and a silver in women’s doubles table tennis alongside Betsy.

Each of the Bristol Village residents who brought home medals from the Ohio Senior Olympics is now qualified for the upcoming regional Senior Olympics event to be held in Portsmouth, Ohio, in September.

“I can do it. Up to 10 miles. After 10 it’s too much,” Marj said with a smile as she turned to look at Betsy. “If you think I can, Betsy, I will!”

Those who medal at the regional event have the chance to qualify for the 2017 National Senior Olympics in Birmingham, Alabama from June 2-15.

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The 1500-meter racewalk winners at the Ohio Senior Olympics.

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The Bristol Village table tennis team at the 2016 Ohio Senior Olympics.

Bringing home the gold at First Community Village

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Char Christensen

By LANCE CRANMER                                                                lcranmer@nationalchurchresidences.org

UPPER ARLINGTON, Ohio – Char Christensen has been to three World Gymnastics Championships, two Pan-Am Games and was in attendance in 1996 when the United States’ women brought home the first-ever team Olympic gold medal in Atlanta.

“I guess you’d say I have a passion,” Christensen joked. “And a full-time job.”

During the week, Christensen is the health care Activities Director at National Church Residences’ First Community Village. In her free time – especially in gymnastics’ busy season from December to April – Christensen is traveling around the country as a highly-renowned judge in the sport she has been involved with since her youth.

“I currently am a national and USA brevet gymnastics judge,” she said, noting that she has officiated at high school, regional, national and NCAA competitions. “I’ve been at that level for 30 years.”

Christensen’s impact on the sport, though made behind the scenes, is on a national scale.

“I am the Region 5 women’s technical chair,” she said. “Which means I sit on a national committee that makes rule changes. It’s a volunteer position that I’ve held for 25 years.”

When the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics begin this week, Christensen will have even had a hand in selecting the members of the US women’s team. Last month at the Olympic trials in San Jose, Christensen served an auxiliary judge for the balance beam event.

“I have a passion for the sport,” she said. “I was a gymnast. My daughter, Katie, went to Minnesota on a full scholarship for gymnastics. I’m a coach, and an official. I guess you could say I’ve experienced it at all levels.”

At First Community Village, Christensen brings her passion for gymnastics to her residents to help them experience the games.

“There’s a huge sports interest here,” she said. “Every four years we do a torch passing ceremony here. It is a resident with a staff member and we go across the building passing the torch off as an opening ceremony.”

As Activities Director, it is Christensen’s job to keep her residents active.

“During the Olympics we do our version of the Olympic Games,” she said. “We do things like tossing balls through the Olympic rings. Residents really enjoy it. We tie in what’s happening with our community. We are bringing the games to them.”

Christensen has been working with the residents at First Community Village for 15 years.

“I love my job. My goal is to stimulate the residents and involve them physically, mentally, socially and spiritually in our world,” she said. “It is very rewarding. You feel like you make a difference in the residents’ lives on a daily basis.”

Though she isn’t a competitive athlete anymore, Christensen said there are still many aspects from her life as a gymnast that influence her daily life today.

“The physical things we do go by the wayside,” she said. “But it is the processes that carry on. It takes hard work and discipline and teaches you how to both succeed and fail in life. It’s about working with a team and following a structure. It’s important to transfer on that value of hard work to your daily living.”

Detroit properties unite to collect water for Flint families in need

 

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Members of the National Church Residences’ Detroit portfolio of properties united to donate and deliver 726 cases of clean water to the people of Flint, Michigan

By LANCE CRANMER                                                              lcranmer@nationalchurchresidences.org

DETROIT – The first time Makeda Hunt drove a truck loaded with bottled water to Catholic Charities of Flint/Owosso to help the families suffering from the Flint Water Crisis, she witnessed an incredible sight.

“When we were unloading the van, a line of cars was coming up just waiting for water,” said Makeda, the Regional Manager who oversees National Church Residences’ Detroit portfolio. “I really saw the need.”

For that first trip to Flint last April, employees and residents of Wayne Tower (in Wayne, MI) collected about 100 cases of water.

After what she saw there, however, Makeda decided to pool all of her Detroit-area resources together and make an effort on a larger scale.

“I knew our regional conference was coming up in May and I would have all of my managers there together,” she said. “It was the perfect opportunity to put the challenge on the table.”

Makeda tasked her team with the goal of collecting as much bottled water, sanitary wipes and bottles of hand sanitizer as possible to help aid with the Flint Water Crisis.

“They exceeded my expectations,” Makeda said. “I was thinking I would have about 500 cases.”

Over a two day span on June 30 and July 1, Makeda went site-to-site collecting donated water from 15 National Church Residences properties.

“It resulted in a total collection of 726 cases of water,” she said. “Enough to fill up a 20-foot U-Haul truck.”

Makeda took the truck (that she personally paid to rent), along with five cars full of volunteers from various National Church Residences sites, to Flint on July 1 to make the donation – just in time for the Fourth of July weekend.

“I am beyond impressed with the amount of cases of water that we were able to collect and have donated to the residents of Flint,” said Sonya Brown, National Church Residences Regional Vice President, whose region includes the Detroit properties. “This exemplifies true teamwork between our staff and our residents, as well as each (of our employees) commitment to our mission.”

The Flint Water Crisis began in late 2014 when the drinking water supply to Flint, Michigan, was switched over from Detroit’s public water system to polluted water from the Flint River.

In the immediate aftermath of the crisis, donations poured in from around the country. But when the Flint Water Crisis stopped being a national headline, donations of clean drinking water began to dwindle.

“While we were there I had an opportunity to talk to one of the directors from Catholic Charities,” Makeda said. There was a semi-truck that they would store the water in when people would make the deliveries. At the time they were down to their last few pallets.”

According to the staff at Catholic Charities, the water donated by National Church Residences employees and residents was enough to provide clean water to 181 Flint families – each is allowed to take a max of four cases per visit.

“I was very impressed with Solberg Tower, who collected 160 cases, and Madison Manor, being our newest addition to the portfolio, who collected 100 cases,” Makeda said. “We have a lot of residents that are low income and financially strapped, but even the ones who couldn’t get out to get water to donate brought money to their managers that we used to go buy water.”

Makeda was proud of the effort her team put in to collect the water, but added that the water crisis in Flint is still ongoing.

“It’s nowhere near over,” she said. “What I found out on my last visit was that families that had newer plumbing, they were able to install water filters. Those that have the filters in their homes now have adequate water. For the homes that are still not up to date, those are the families that suffer the most and need the most water. They still can’t utilize the city water.”

The National Church Residences Detroit team would like to organize one more water drive before winter. Anyone interested in making a donation can contact Makeda Hunt at mhunt@nationalchurchresidences.org.

Properties that contributed to the water drive included: Lakeside Towers, Lakeside Villa, Meadow Creek Village, Clinton Place Apartments, Canton Place, Clark East Tower, Columbia Court, Romulus Tower, Solberg Tower, Madison Tower, Madison Manor, Wayne Tower, Park Place of Harper Woods, Eden Manor, and Evangelical Manor.

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A pallet of water donated by National Church Residences to the residents of Flint, Michigan.

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Members of the National Church Residences Detroit Team filled a 20-foot U-haul truck with donated water for Flint, Michigan.

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The 20-foot truck was packed to the top with donated water — 726 cases!

‘Richwood desperately needs your hope…’

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Volunteer Colton Naylor helps unload a van of supplies brought to Edgewood Village from the National Church Residences home office in Columbus on Friday, July 1.

By LANCE CRANMER                                                               lcranmer@nationalchurchresidences.org

RICHWOOD, WV – “Don’t take the high road. That’s where they had a lot of the damage,” Kim Carpenter, the property manager at Edgewood Village, told me over the phone as my rented van rumbled slowly down Route 39. “Take the lower road. That’s Edgewood, where our building is. It’s a little bit clearer.”

It had been nearly a week since 10 inches of rain battered Richwood overnight, causing the Cherry River to overflow its banks and put much of the city under water, but the cleanup was still ongoing.

Earlier in the week, the staff at the National Church Residences home office in Columbus began gathering donated food, water and supplies to send to Richwood to aid the residents of Edgewood Village, a 34-unit low-income senior community that the organization has managed since 1991.

The outpouring of donations was nothing less than amazing.

In two days the central office staff pulled together enough supplies to completely pack a 9-foot UHaul van that I, along with my fiancée Kristen, would drive to the building on July 1.

Six hours after leaving Columbus – one road closure at the heavily-flooded community of Belva, and one delay due to road damage on Route 39 between Summersville and Richwood, later – we were nearing our destination.

Turning down Edgewood Avenue and heading toward the city, the views were contrasting: At first, neighbors working together to clean out a home, hauling waterlogged furniture out into the yard. Then, a house completely off its foundation, washed over the cliff that overlooks the river.

This wasn’t my first visit to Richwood.

My journalism career started in southern West Virginia in 2001 and I’d stumbled upon the Nicholas County city of about 2,000 when I’d been sent to do a story about the Cherry River Festival – a quaint street fair the city held each year.

Though I’d only been there less than a dozen times, I’d always had an affinity for Richwood. Walking down Main Street, you can feel Richwood’s history around you. It is easy to feel the bustle of the mountain boom town it once was in the 1930s.

But the closure of the sawmill, the clothespin factory (once the largest in the world) and the nearby coal mines drove its residents elsewhere looking for work. Richwood lost a quarter of its population in the 1950s, and then another 21 percent in the 1980s.

Richwood had struggled throughout its history, but the people who remained were proud of their city and worked hard to keep it alive.

When I began working for National Church Residences in the winter of 2014, I noticed that Edgewood Village was one of ours. I remembered seeing the building the last time I was in town. I wondered if I’d ever have a reason to pay it another visit. I had hoped I would. I never thought it would be on these terms.

As we pulled up out front of Edgewood Village, it was obvious that our residents were luckier than some others in Richwood. The flood waters had rolled downhill from the higher elevated north end of town toward Edgewood Village, which sits in the valley nearer to the Cherry River, and deposited inches of thick mud all around the building. Luckily, though, the floodwaters never entered Edgewood Village, instead passing just feet around the building and filling the small ravine behind it and completely destroying the Dairy Queen next door.

“We lost power when they had to shut down the sub-station down the road,” Kim Mills, the building’s maintenance technician told me. “But luckily, just last year we purchased a generator for the building.”

Kim let his residents know that Kristen and I had arrived and a small group of them met us at the front door of Edgewood Village to help unload the truck. At the same time, Tim Naylor, a friend and former co-worker of mine from Fayetteville, WV, arrived with his son Colton to volunteer their help.

Within an hour our truck was unloaded and the building’s community room was overflowing with supplies.

A few at a time, residents began to sort through the donated goods, modestly picking out only what they needed – leaving the rest for someone else who they probably felt was worse off than they were.

With a long trip home ahead of us, Kristen and I paused to take a few photos inside the building before walking the few blocks up into the center of town to get a first-hand look at the damage.

The journalist in me wanted to document the devastation to spread the word to a larger audience about what had happened. But I had no desire to be intrusive. I took photos only of the National Guardsmen working to clear the debris and the glaring signs of destruction left behind when the water receeded.

The Oakford, a small tavern on Oakford Avenue, the city’s largest north/south running street, had its door open. As I approached it a man stepped outside to tell me, “We’re closed indefinitely. But I think she’s open a few doors over.”

Just two people sat in Carolyn’s, a pool hall a few buildings north on Oakford Avenue.

“The flood started up on the hill and rolled down. All the houses up there, the water just went right through them,” the woman behind the bar said. “My house got it bad.”

Still, though, on that Friday afternoon, she was at work.

Kristen and I sat for just a brief conversation before we began the nearly 300 mile journey back home.

It took some time over the long weekend to let everything I’d seen soak in. It felt good to help. It felt good to have made the journey and done something – anything – that might have made a difference. It’s still hard to tell myself that anyone could do enough.

It’s hard to know that people are still digging out from the mess, still pulling their destroyed furniture and belongings into the street to be hauled away, still dealing with the feeling of helplessness that was dumped on them along with millions of gallons of water.

Today I received an e-mail from Kim Carpenter updating us all on the situation in Richwood and thanking those of us at the central office for our kindness.

“Richwood still looks like a war zone, with river rock lining the sidewalks and streets,” she said. “Cleanup will take months. The local Rite Aid has passed out flyers saying they will be rebuilding here in town. I have no heard anything about the Dollar General store, or whether the new grocery store will continue to rebuild. Most residents of Richwood did not have flood insurance, and those that did had limited coverage.”

She added that the donated items will greatly help the residents of Edgewood Village who now are without any local stores where they could buy everyday items.

In the last week, Edgewood Village has filled two vacancies with Richwood residents who lost everything in the flood.

One family, the Marlowes, had been in the same house for 60 years.

“The flood completely demolished their home,” Kim said. “They were in water up to their necks and climbed the stairs to their attic. I believe they may have been there for over 24 hours, perhaps even longer, before they were rescued.

“During their initial application process (to live at Edgewood Village), Mrs. Marlow’s only concern was that they lost their beautiful gardens.”

West Virginia still needs help. I encourage you to donate to the National Church Residences foundation, the Red Cross, the United Way or any of the countless charities set up to help.

“Thank you for continuing the Mission, as the City of Richwood desperately needs your hope, compassion and daily prayers,” Kim said. “God bless you all!”

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Edgewood Village maintenance technician Kim Mills rolls a cart full of donated items into the community room at Edgewood Village.

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The West Virginia National Guard was still working at cleanup efforts a week after the flood that tore through Richwood.

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The mud that covered the parking lot at Edgewood Village in Richwood, West Virginia, is now a large pile of dirt sitting in the building’s parking lot.

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Edgewood Village in Richwood, West Virginia.

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A portion of the donated items after being brought into the community room at Edgewood Village.

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Items damaged during the flood in Richwood were dragged out into the streets awaiting removal by the crews from the National Guard.

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Welcome to Richwood.

Unloading the Van

Unloading the van.

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National Church Residences Media/Public Relations Specialist Lance Cranmer and his fiancee Kristen drove the van full of donated supplies from the central office in Columbus to Edgewood Village in Richwood, West Virginia.

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National Guard dump trucks haul away debris from the flood while a single childrens’ sandal lies next to the street looking south on Oakford Avenue in Richwood, WV.